Tapeley Park | History of Tapeley Park
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Long before the Norman Conquest, a lot of years past, the occupiers of Tapeley (or Tapelia, as it was called in the Domesday Guide) have, from their raised tableland, been in a position to look back in the tidal River Torridge, across to the quite and one time significant port of Bideford (which throughout the 1600’s was the second-largest port in United Kingdom managing more tonnage than Liverpool, Bristol, Southampton and Plymouth set together), and across to the large growing hamlet of Northam.

Therefore beyond to the primeval village of Appledore, also to the Isle of Lundy, possessed for some time from the Christie Family – a really staggering bird’s-eye perspective, disappearing to the horizon over the Atlantic. The “Clevland reign” started in 1702 when Commodore William Clevland sailed his great boat up the River Torridge, as well as on a closer review of Tapeley through his telescope, is purported to have mentioned “That is the area for me personally”.

Tapeley was in those times a seven bayed white-stuccoed farmhouse. He married Miss Anna Davie of Orleigh Manor, Bideford, as well as their son John Clevland became the solJohn Clevland, Tapeley Parke Secretary to the Admiralty from 1751 until his departure in 1763. John Clevland’s son, also known as John Clevland, took over Tapeley and sat as Member for seven consecutive Parliaments for Barnstaple. In this time he added the dining area and adjoining Dairy farm yard where he amused his constituents. Among the second John Clevland’s brothers called Augustus (born 1754, died 1784), joined the East India Business and went to India where he became Governor of the State of Bengal.

Whilst there, ‘without bloodshed or terror of power, utilizing just the method of conciliation, self-confidence along with benevolence (and the present of his daughter’s home-baked cakes),’ tried and executed the complete subjection of the lawless and savage inhabitants of the Jungleterry hill tribes of Rajamahall. John Clevland was succeeded by his nephew, Augustus Saltren Willet Clevland who married Margaret Chichester of Arlington Courtroom. They had a son, Archibald, and two girls, Agnes and Caroline. Archibald joined the 17th Lancers aged 17 and was 1 of just three Policemen to endure the Cost of the Mild Brigade. His bravery and predicament can best be viewed in a letter he wrote to his uncle after Balaclava in 1854:-
THE MILD BRIGAGE

The Light BrigadeTen times subsequent to the Cost of the Mild Brigade, Archibald was killed in the Battle of Inkermann. New York Times gave the following report of the Fight of Inkermann:- “And now commenced the bloodiest battle ever seen since warfare cursed the world. It’s been doubted by military historians if a charge has been ever stood by any enemy with all the bayonet; but here the bayonet was frequently the sole weapon used in struggles of the very mortal and obstinate character. We’ve been prone to think that no foe could actually withstand the British soldier wielding his favorite weapon, and that at Maida solely did the enemy actually cross bayonets with him; but, in the battle of Inkermann, not only did we cost in vain – not only were distressed encounters between masses of males kept with the bayonet solely – but we were obliged to resist bayonet to bayonet the Russian infantry repeatedly, as they billed us with unbelievable fury and enthusiasm.” The report additionally mentioned Archibald Clevland by title … One Policeman Cornet Clevland, was hit with a bit of shell in the medial side, and has since expired.
In 1856 a monument was erected to Archibald in the area around the seaward aspect of the home using a 50foot obelisk rising from this. The obelisk was ruined by lightening in 1933 throughout a freak thunderstorm when, as per an area paper, blocks of granite were thrown 100-feet to the atmosphere and also the iron railings twisted.

Augustus Clevland and Matilda

Augustus ClevlandArchibalds headgear Archibald’s headgear with the skull and crossbones and symbol of the monarchy depicting ‘The Dying and Glory lads’, with silver breast pyouch revealing among 3 spear wounds he received throughout the conflict. In the astounding glass dome there too is a lock of his hair plus a ring he delivered back to his Mum – it was as if he understood he’d used up his nine lives … .

The New York Times report of the Fight of Inkerman at the time gave it the subsequent grizzly evaluation:

“And now commenced the bloodiest battle ever seen since warfare cursed the world. It’s been doubted by military historians if a charge has been ever stood by any enemy with all the bayonet; but here the bayonet was frequently the sole weapon used in struggles of the very mortal and obstinate character. We’ve been prone to think that no foe could actually withstand the British soldier wielding his favorite weapon, and that at Maida solely did the enemy actually cross bayonets with him; but, in the battle of Inkerman, not only did we cost in vain – not only were distressed encounters between masses of males kept with the bayonet solely – but we were obliged to resist bayonet to bayonet the Russian infantry repeatedly, as they billed us with unbelievable fury and enthusiasm.” The conflict raged for 3 times and nighttime. There was likewise a reference in the exact same report of Archibald’s death: “Our own cavalry, the remnant of the mild brigade, were transferred right into a situation where it had been expected they may be of support; but these were not enough to try anything, even though they were drafted they dropped several horses plus some men. One Policeman, Cornet Clevland, was hit with a bit of shell in the medial side, and has since expired. They’re currently just two Officers left together with the fragment of the 17th Lancers – Captain GODFREY MORGAN and Cornet GEORGE WOMBWELL.”

The Monument, Tapeley Park The Monument with balls of granite “some that ended up in the woods 300 yards away” according to Charlie Gorvin who began work at Tapeley in 19-22. Charlie perished in a Estate bungalow in 1999 and was Head Gardener for several decades. He informed me of the almighty fracture he observed whilst employed in the kitchen backyard, along the above mentioned facts, six months before he perished.